SemanticsBabble receives its 6th annual IAH grant

SemanticsBabble, the interdisciplinary discussion group on formal and experimental approaches to language meaning that is lead by Ivano Caponigro (Linguistics) and Jonathan Cohen (Philosophy), has just been awarded its 6th annual grant from the UCSD Institute of Arts and Humanities. The grant will help with inviting scholars and students from other institutions to present and discuss their current research on language meaning during the academic year 2018-2019.

UC San Diego Linguistics at CUNY

Our graduate students Dayoung Kim and Till Poppels, our postdoc William Matchin, and our faculty members Grant Goodall, Andrew Kehler, and Eva Wittenberg are presenting five posters at the ​31st Annual CUNY Sentence Processing Conference at UC Davis on March 15-17, 2018:

Suhas Arehalli and Eva Wittenberg: “The mess reveals the system: People use top-down cues to resolve errors in contexts with highly random noise, but not with highly structured noise”

Dayoung Kim and Grant Goodall: “Complexity effects in A- and A’-dependencies”

Adam Morgan, Titus von der Malsburg, Victor S. Ferreira and Eva Wittenberg: “This is the structure that we wonder why anyone produces it: Resumptive pronouns in English hinder comprehension”

Till Poppels and Andrew Kehler: “Reconsidering asymmetries in voice-mismatched verb phrase ellipsis”

William Matchin, Diogo Almeida, Jon Sprouse, and Gregory Hickok: “Subject island violations involve increased semantic processing, but not increased verbal working memory resources: evidence from fMRI”

William Matchin is also giving a talk:

William Matchin, Christian Brodbeck, Christopher Hammerly, and Ellen Lau:
“The temporal dynamics of structure and content in the language network”

Language Comprehension Lab Talks

The Language Comprehension Lab has two talks at the AMLaP-Asia 2018 conference in Hyderabad, India:

“This is the structure that we wonder why anyone produces it: Resumptive pronouns in English hinder comprehension”
Talk by Adam Morgan, Titus von der Malsburg, Victor S. Ferreira and Eva Wittenberg

“Frequency effects modulate argument sharing effects in Hindi LVCs”
Talk by Ashwini Vaidya and Eva Wittenberg

Nina Semushina awarded CARTA Anthropogeny Fellowship

Graduate student Nina Semushina just received a CARTA Anthropogeny Fellowship for 2017-2018 year! She joined Anthropogeny Student Specialization Track a year ago, and since then she has actively participated in the program. This winter she got an MA in Linguistics from our Department and now is preparing for her future qualifying exam. Her thesis will be about the impact of delayed first language acquisition on quantitative reasoning and acquisition of numerical concepts.

More information about the Graduate Specialization in Anthropogeny can be found here: http://ling.ucsd.edu/grad/anthropogeny-specialization.html