Rachel Mayberry gave two invited talks

Faculty Rachel Mayberry recently gave two invited talks in discussing recent findings regarding the critical period for language:

“Post-childhood first-language development: What it looks like and what it means,” a keynote presented at the First National Conference about teaching Portuguese as a second language for the Deaf: the curriculum of basic education and higher education on November 10, 2020.

“The acquisition of sentence structure under conditions of extreme language delay,” an invited talk given to the Linguistics Department at the University of Pennsylvania on November 13, 2020.

 

 

Cheng and Mayberry have a new paper in Developmental Science

Alumna Qi Cheng (Ph.D. 2020), currently assistant professor in the Linguistics Department at the University of Washington, and faculty Rachel Mayberry have recently published a research paper finding that late first-language learners of ASL use event structure rather than word order to comprehend basic sentence structure.

Cheng Q. & Mayberry, R. I. 2020. “When event knowledge overrides word order in sentence comprehension: Learning a first language after childhood.” Developmental Science.
DOI: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/desc.13073

 

Scott Seyfarth and Marc Garellek have a new paper in LabPhon

Scott Seyfarth (Ph.D. 2016) and Marc Garellek published an article in LabPhon entitled “Physical and phonological causes of coda /t/ glottalization in the mainstream American English of central Ohio.”

In this paper, Scott and Marc claim that voiceless stops in American English involve glottal constriction to produce voicelessness in coda position. The distribution of glottalized coda /t/ in the Buckeye Corpus can be explained by phonetic conditions which either favor reduction of the oral closure, or else reinforce the irregular voicing associated with the glottal constriction gesture. However, they find evidence that glottalization is also phonologically planned, especially before sonorants.

Seyfarth, S., & Garellek, M. (2020). Physical and phonological causes of coda /t/ glottalization in the mainstream American English of central Ohio. Laboratory Phonology: Journal of the Association for Laboratory Phonology11(1), 24. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/labphon.213

Will Styler presents at ISSP 2020

Faculty member Will Styler presented a poster titled “The role of speech planning in the articulation of pause postures” at the (virtual) 12th International Seminar on Speech Production on December 14-18, together with Jelena Krivokapic (University of Michigan) and Dani Byrd (USC). The poster presents ongoing research examining subtle articulations of the lips and tongue which occur during pauses, referred to as ‘pause postures’, and describes their relationship with the planning of upcoming utterances.

Mayberry Lab presenting at the HDLS 14

The Mayberry Lab gave three presentations at the 14th biennial High Desert Linguistics Society (HDLS) conference on November 20-22, 2020. Nina Feygl Semushina, Monica Keller, & Rachel Mayberry discussed the effects of early language deprivation on the acquisition of plural classifiers in American Sign Language (ASL) (talk). Agnes Villwock & Rachel Mayberry presented aMEG (anatomic magnetoencephalography) data regarding the differential activations of L1 and late L1 ASL signers while performing a picture matching task (talk). Tory Sampson & Rachel Mayberry presented experimental data regarding the use of SELF in ASL and whether it is used to predicate individual-level predicates (i.e., predicates that describe a characteristic inherent to an entity) (talk/poster).

Alicia Muñoz Sánchez and Stéphanie Gaillard presented at SOLPHE

Spanish Academic coordinator Alicia Muñoz Sánchez and French Academic coordinator Stéphanie Gaillard gave a talk on “The core of language teaching: an approach to effective teacher training” at the Symposium on Language Pedagogy in Higher Education on Saturday October 3rd, 2020. The conference was supposed to take place in Urbana-Champaign, Illinois but was moved online because of COVID-19.